Learning

Exposure Compensation: Snowbirds

What is exposure compensation and how do you use it? There are plenty of situations where using exposure compensation can improve your photos – at weddings, around a campfire, at air shows, taking shots of a nighttime skyline, etc. Exposure compensation exists on your camera so you can add brightness to images that come out too dark, or to remove brightness in images that are too bright to begin with. That’s it, plain and simple. Here are some tips on how and when to use exposure compensation.

Photo of a Guitar shows depth of field

Depth of field is an old term. It can be described as being the range of distances in an image where the image comes into focus to the distance where the image goes out of focus. There are three criteria for depth of field: Lens focal length, Aperture / Lens Opening, and the distance between the camera and subject. We will examine them individually, but keep in mind that their effects are cumulative.

Regardless of how many lenses you have, pick one, and then pick a focal length on the lens. If the lens is a prime, like a 50mm, this is easy. If it’s a zoom, pick a focal length somewhere in the zoom range and, using a piece of tape, prevent the zoom ring from moving. You now have a single focal length. The challenge is to find ways to construct your composition, your subject placement and your framing.

Flower photography with one continuous light source and a white background

Spring is coming and as I write this it, it’s 17 degrees outside and it feels like spring is here. When the weather changes, the flowers start to bloom and photographers become inspired to make images of the beautiful colours and shapes that announce an end to winter. Sadly, many photos of flowers are lacking something. Flowers are challenging to shoot well, because they are naturally beautiful and to make the image special, we need to do more. Managing the light, and the angle are methods to make better flower […]