Figure 5: Sunset Graduated Filter

For those photographers who shoot JPEGs only and are not interested in a lot of post-processing work, a creative filter system is ideal for more creativity in-camera. Cokin’s filter system, for example, is an easy-to-use, flexible option that offers a variety of creative opportunities.

Photo of a Guitar shows depth of field

Depth of field is an old term. It can be described as being the range of distances in an image where the image comes into focus to the distance where the image goes out of focus. There are three criteria for depth of field: Lens focal length, Aperture / Lens Opening, and the distance between the camera and subject. We will examine them individually, but keep in mind that their effects are cumulative.

Regardless of how many lenses you have, pick one, and then pick a focal length on the lens. If the lens is a prime, like a 50mm, this is easy. If it’s a zoom, pick a focal length somewhere in the zoom range and, using a piece of tape, prevent the zoom ring from moving. You now have a single focal length. The challenge is to find ways to construct your composition, your subject placement and your framing.

A Path Through a Forest Blanketed With Trilliums

For about three weeks in early Spring, great swathes of elegant White Trilliums carpet the floors of forests, before trees’ leaves fully develop and block out the sunlight. It’s a great opportunity to get out and photograph the abundance of wildflowers that can’t be seen at any other time of year.

Teleconverters

Spring is a great time of year to start thinking about teleconverters. Useful for bird, wildlife & sports photography, teleconverters are viable alternatives to spending thousands of dollars on a long lens. A teleconverter, paired with a decent zoom lens of reasonable speed, is a fine choice. This article dispels common myths about teleconverters, and explains just how useful they can be.